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Feminist Five: Top Feminist Books of 2019

Feminist Five: Top Feminist Books of 2019

Despite setting up this blog towards the end of 2018, it wasn’t until I broke my arm and got signed-off from work that I properly started paying attention to what I was reading. As it turned out, until that point the majority of books that I read were written by men. So, from Spring onwards I made a concerted effort to not only read more books by women, but also explore the topic of feminism. Here are my top five feminist books of 2019 …

1. Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez

Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez

Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez

Publishing House: Chatto & Windus, a Vintage imprint

Invisible Women, Exposing Data Bias in A World Designed For Men was the first book that I read in 2019 that was written by a woman. As stated in my review: this is a book that made me angry. This is a book that made me sad. This is a book that made me cry. But, ultimately, this is a book we all need to read.

Chocker-block full of statistics, Criado Perez doesn’t shy away from any topic covering healthcare, medicine, technology, workplaces, politics, and violence against women.

Despite being a little dubious about the size of the book – I was still very much in a brace, and getting to grip with my physio sessions – this was an easy read, and very captivating. I’m constantly recommending to friends and family, and that is absolutely why it has to be on this list.

Also not to boast (but to totally boast) I have a signed copy!

2. Know My Name by Chanel Miller

Know My Name by Chanel Miller

Know My Name by Chanel Miller

Publishing House: Viking, a Penguin Books imprint

A slightly different book to the rest on this list, Know My Name is a memoir.

“Know My Name will forever transform the way we think about sexual assault, challenging our belief about what is acceptable and speaking truth to the tumultuous reality of healing. It also introduces readers to an extraordinary writer, one whose words have already changed our world. Entwining pain, resilience, and humour, this memoir will stand as a modern classic”

I virtually cried the entire way through this book; completely human, completely vulnerable, completely and utterly inspiring.

3. Misogynation by Laura Bates

Invisible Women, Asking For It, What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape, Misogynation, Delusions of Gender, Too Fat Too Slutty Too Loud, The War on Women

Feminist Books 2019

Publishing House: Simon & Schuster

I read Misogynation towards the end of 2019. I love Bates’ writing style, so having her Guardian pieces compiled in one place was epic from my point of view.

Read across two-sittings in one weekend this book left me absolutely livid. Reinforcing a lot what I was already aware of (in part thanks to Invisible Women) Misgynation really opened my eyes to the extent of ingrained sexism in modern Britain.

4. Feminists Don’t Wear Pink curated by Scarlet Curtis

Feminist Don't Wear Pink curated by Scarlet Curtis

Feminist Don’t Wear Pink curated by Scarlet Curtis

Publishing House: Penguin

Feminists Don’t Wear Pink (and other Lies) was my first dabble in audiobooks. I have to say the jury is still very much out for me on the format, but I have found that having the physical book to read along with particularly helpful.

Curated by Scarlet Curtis Feminists Don’t Wear Pink is a collection of essays/thoughts/poems from various contributors about what feminism means to them. What I particularly enjoyed about this book is the feeling of literary creativity – something that is often missed in non-fiction.

A great coffee table book; something that can be read over an extended period of time, with multiple voices and narratives.

5. We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Publishing House: 4th Estate

What list of feminist books would be complete without We Should All Be Feminists – quite frankly, none.

Adapted from a TedX talk one of my favourite quotes of all time comes from this book:

“And I would like today to ask that we should dream about and plan for a different world. A fairer world. A world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves. And this is how to start: we must raise our daughters differently. We must also raise our sons differently.

Short, simple, and sweet. A great-way to steal some time away for yourself with a pot of coffee.

Instagram: @nonfictionmillennial
Twitter: @ReadingNonFic

3 Comments

  1. Brooke says

    I’m curious about Know my Name, just not sure whether to buy a copy yet. I look forward to a full-review hopefully?

    Like

  2. Pingback: Memoir Madness: Top Five Memoirs of 2019 | The Reading Millennial

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